May 2017
S M T W T F S
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
Home Worship Services

postheadericon r u texting?

Epiphany 2011 - r u texting?

The Greek roots of the word “epiphany” means to “show around” or “to reveal”, going back to the image of the infant Jesus being “shown” to the Magi. In our case we are going to “reveal” or “unveil” some texts.

The 2011 Epiphany series at Bathurst will feature a series of sermons by diverse preachers connected to our community. Hearing from several skilled and trained theological voices in our community as they wrestle with a text will be a gift indeed.

Now the ball is in your court: r u texting with us for the next few weeks? These are the preachers.

  • March 6, Transfiguration/Trans-formance
    Ralph Carl Wushke & Beth Theis, Matthew 17:1-8
  • Feb 27, Epiphany VIII The Kingdom of God as Non-Violence
    Diane Meredith, Matthew 6:25-33
  • Feb 20, Epiphany VII : Annual General Meeting

  • Feb 13, Epiphany VI : Sharon Goodier,
    Walking in the Spirit: Salvation in Community in Paul and Gustavo Guttierez
  • Feb 6, Epiphany V :  Judi McCallum,
    Luke 14:15-24: Feminist Liberation Theology and the Commonwealth of God
  • Jan 30, Epiphany IV : Ralph Carl Wushke, Matthew 5:1-12
  • Jan 23, Epiphany III : Kelly Colwell, Matt 4:12-23
  • Jan 16, Epiphany II : Frances Combs, John 2: 1-12 “Marriage at Cana”
  • Jan 9, Epiphany I : Ralph Carl Wushke, John 1: 29-34 “Who is after me, but before me?”
  • Jan 2, Christmas II : Beth Theis, John 1:1-5, 14-18 “Holy Wisdom

postheadericon Epiphany 2011 with Bathurst: r u texting?

Because Easter is very late in 2011 the Epiphany season is exceptionally long. The Greek roots of the word epiphany means to “show around” or “to reveal”, going back to the image of the infant Jesus being “shown” to the Magi. In our case we are going to “reveal” or “unveil” some texts.

The 2011Epiphany series at Bathurst will feature a series of sermons by diverse preachers connected to our community. Hearing from several skilled and trained theological voices in our community as they wrestle with a text will be a gift indeed.

For the peoples of the book, there is always a complex relationship to “text.” Some texts are familiar and evoke positive or negative reaction. Some familiar texts remain complex enigmas. Unfamiliar texts can surprise us with a new insight to an old truth. The late inter-faith scholar, Wilfred Cantwell-Smith talked about the “scriptural quality of scripture” offering the promise that some texts, while not technically  “Scripture” do have a “scriptural quality”: offering sacred, spiritual, transformative wisdom. That might include “texts” in other than printed words: icons, movies, art-works, even speech acts, like Martin
Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech.

Hermeneutics is the study of the process of making meaning from texts or how we get from a text (words on a page or a computer screen) to “meaning”? One of the steps preachers use when “texting” is exegesis – a systematic study of the text including grammar, vocabulary, literary style and cultural context – the last part of which should be to identify the text’s claim or promise for our lives. (Tom Long, The Witness of Preaching.) The next decisive step in the sermon is an exercise in “theological reflection” which draws the insights of the texts as part our tradition into constellation with culture and our  experience, to bring about  transformation (Whitehead & Whitehead,  Method in Ministry: Theological Reflection and Christian Community).

Perhaps the most succinct summary of this process is offered by my old friend Barbara K. Lundblad, professor of preaching at Union Seminary in New York: “The text sits beside us like a conversation partner on the bus. Will we be open to a new hearing? … This particular conversation has never happened before: this text speaking to these people in this time and place. Through such Spirit-born conversation, God is at work transforming memory into presence.” Barbara K. Lundblad, Transforming the Stone. (as quoted in Long, 69.)


postheadericon Advent and Christmas

 

Advent & Christmas

 

SOON AND VERY SOON!
Who is singing “soon, and very soon” today? How and to whom does Jesus come today? Where and when can we celebrate the promise, “soon and very soon”?
WRAPS for Advent: Sharon Goodier and Ralph Carl Wushke
  • Sunday, November 28 Advent I
  • Sunday, December 5 Advent II
  • Sunday, December 12 Advent III
  • Sunday, December 19 Advent IV
    Christmas Choral Service, Bathurst Choir and Bev Lewis, Music Coordinator
  • Christmas Eve, December 24
    Joint Communion with Trinity-St. Paul’s. 10:00 pm.
  • Sunday, December 26First Sunday after Christmas Christmas Breakfast at 10:00 am and Christmas Storytelling

postheadericon Sundays of Solidarity

Sundays of Solidarity

A three-part series on Palestine, Mining Abuses, and Indigenous Rights.

Ralph Carl Wushke is the WRAP for this Season.

 

Sunday, November 7

Solidarity with Palestine

Frances Combs and Ronny Yaron

Sunday, November 14 Solidarity with Earth: Mines, Miners and Bill C-300
Ralph Carl Wushke & Diane Meredith
Sunday, November 21 Beat the Drum: Changing the Climate on Indigenous Rights
Reg McQuaid, Joan O’Laney

 

postheadericon Deity Journeys

Deity Journeys

Exploring the evolution of the sacred divine in our human and personal stories.
Jasper Miller is WRAP for this season.

  • Sunday, October 17 Deity Journeys I
    “From the Time when God was a Woman” Ralph Carl Wushke & Jasper Miller
  • Sunday, October 24 - Deity Journeys II
    “A Personal journey to the sacred through Buddhism and Shamanism” Harold Alden & John Wang
  • Sunday, October 31 - Deity Journeys III
    “A Personal Spiritual Story”Donna Dolson & Jasper Miller

Next Service:

Sunday, May 28

10:30 am in the Chapel at Trinity St. Paul's Centre
427 Bloor St. West

Power & witness
in the Holy Spirit
Ralph Carl Wushke

Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org!